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If you want extraordinary performance, know extraordinary performers.

Joshua earned a PhD in Astrophysics and an MBA, both at Columbia University, where he studied under a Nobel Laureate. He teaches and coaches leadership at Columbia, NYU, and privately. He has founded several companies, one operating globally since 1999, with a half-dozen patents to his name. He competed athletically at a national and world level.

He writes from experience and a scientist’s perspective on creating success professionally and personally – leadership, entrepreneurship, emotions, social skills, influence, decision-making, negotiation, conflict resolution, perception, motivation, attraction, managing groups and teams, and more.


He has been quoted and profiled in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, USA Today, Fortune, CNN, and the major broadcast networks.

His coaching clients come from McKinsey, Bain, BCG, JP Morgan, Google, and more.

His clients include graduates of Columbia, Harvard, MIT, Stanford, Princeton, Dartmouth, Penn, and more.

Esquire Magazine named him “Best and Brightest” in its annual Genius issue.

You can book him as a coach or speaker.

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FROM THE BLOG

At Princeton’s Elab to early stage entrepreneurs: financials and high school chemistry class

posted by Joshua on May 27, 2016 in Education, Entrepreneurship, Events
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I got a few short clips from my presentation on entrepreneurship when I spoke at Princeton’s Elab recently.

Here I talk about creating and playing with financials as an early-stage entrepreneur. Many investors downplay early-stage financials, since every entrepreneur creates perfect ones that show tremendous growth.

Creating and playing with financials is valuable! Do them when you’re starting.

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They force you to show your project is sustainable

Before doing them, many entrepreneurs think their businesses will profit easily. First passes at financials often show they won’t make money, meaning they aren’t sustainable, forcing them to rethink their business.

If you don’t see a profit, you’ll have to raise revenues, lower costs, or both. The video explains what happens and what you have to account for and what that has to do with high school chemistry class.

They lead you to see your business’s details

Nothing reveals a company’s details like the numbers. If you don’t know its details, you don’t know your business, which will create disasters when trying to get investment, hire people, or the like.

They show your main assumptions

Changing your numbers leads you to simplify changing them, which usually leads you to separate your assumptions from the body of the spreadsheet. What you separate tends to be the core areas to work on your business. Usually adoption rates, supplier costs, and a few others appear. Every business has its unique set of assumptions.

Do you numbers and you’ll learn yours.

They motivate and give you ownership

No matter how much others discount your projections, doing them gives you a sense of ownership of your business like nothing else.

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12 Adrenaline-Rush Activities You Can Do Today That Beat Jumping Out Of A Plane

posted by Joshua on May 26, 2016 in Inc.com
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My Inc.com article today, “12 Adrenaline-Rush Activities You Can Do Today That Beat Jumping Out Of A Plane” began 12 Adrenaline-Rush Activities You Can Do Today That Beat Jumping Out Of A Plane However thrilling, skydiving, bungee jumping, and such are passive. You sign up and they take care of everything. How about something more[…] Keep reading →

Myers-Briggs is baseless and stagnates your life. Here’s how to make money improving people’s lives while undermining it.

posted by Joshua on May 25, 2016 in Education, Entrepreneurship
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I’ve written before about the problems with the Myers-Briggs test. Wikipedia points to plenty of research that shows it lacks validity, utility, reliability, and that its underlying model of four dichotomies has no evidence. I’ve written about how its model that your traits on four axes stay the same independent of situation don’t help you[…] Keep reading →