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If you want extraordinary performance, know extraordinary performers.

Joshua earned a PhD in Astrophysics and an MBA, both at Columbia University, where he studied under a Nobel Laureate. He teaches and coaches leadership at Columbia, NYU, and privately. He has founded several companies, one operating globally since 1999, with a half-dozen patents to his name. He competed athletically at a national and world level.

He writes from experience and a scientist’s perspective on creating success professionally and personally – leadership, entrepreneurship, emotions, social skills, influence, decision-making, negotiation, conflict resolution, perception, motivation, attraction, managing groups and teams, and more.


He has been quoted and profiled in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, USA Today, Fortune, CNN, and the major broadcast networks.

His coaching clients come from McKinsey, Bain, BCG, JP Morgan, Google, and more.

His clients include graduates of Columbia, Harvard, MIT, Stanford, Princeton, Dartmouth, Penn, and more.

Esquire Magazine named him “Best and Brightest” in its annual Genius issue.

You can book him as a coach or speaker.

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FROM THE BLOG

Leadership, adulthood, responsibility, empathy, and consequences to one’s actions

posted by Joshua on April 23, 2014 in Leadership
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A client asked about what he considered a moral decision.

As you know, leading others means people will follow you. You have to decide what you take responsibility for when people around you don’t have your experience or skills.

I gave the following advice, which my client said led him to reflect deeply on how he and everyone involved would feel—what I call with empathy and compassion.

I treat all adults as adults who make choices for themselves. I don’t find it healthy to take responsibility for any other adult’s choices, nor to regard any other adult’s choices as anything but theirs. I don’t know what agreement any other two people made between themselves or expectations they have. I only presume everyone makes what they consider the right decisions for themselves. We also have to make the right decisions for ourselves. I’m not aware of any book in the sky that states what’s absolutely right or wrong that everyone agrees to.

The main consideration for me is the consequences of our actions. How do you think everyone involved will feel and react to what you do? Since only you were in the situation, you have the best idea.

Thinking about consequences as opposed to blindly following rules makes you adopt other people’s perspectives and imagine their feelings.

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How to win over a stadium of 20,000 angry African soccer fans

posted by Joshua on April 22, 2014 in Creativity, Humor, Leadership
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“You! You cannot do that here!” A voice in a stadium of 20,000 people told my friend he was breaking a rule. The man yelling pointed at my friend and sounded angry. A man next to the first saw what he was pointing at—my friend—and pointed and yelled he couldn’t do that here too. Then[…] Keep reading →

Binary thinking that ruins your life

posted by Joshua on April 21, 2014 in Awareness, Freedom, Leadership
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Another coach emailed me about my posts about the bankrupt concepts of introversion and extroversion, which he described as That binary thinking you highlight is the bane of my working life! People who escape from that kind of thinking discover great freedom in their thoughts, which they usually use to create better lifestyles, relationships, thoughts,[…] Keep reading →