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If you want extraordinary performance, know extraordinary performers.

Joshua earned a PhD in Astrophysics and an MBA, both at Columbia University, where he studied under a Nobel Laureate. He teaches and coaches leadership at Columbia, NYU, and privately. He has founded several companies, one operating globally since 1999, with a half-dozen patents to his name. He competed athletically at a national and world level.

He writes from experience and a scientist’s perspective on creating success professionally and personally – leadership, entrepreneurship, emotions, social skills, influence, decision-making, negotiation, conflict resolution, perception, motivation, attraction, managing groups and teams, and more.


He has been quoted and profiled in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, USA Today, Fortune, CNN, and the major broadcast networks.

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FROM THE BLOG

Avoiding food packaging

posted by Joshua on April 20, 2015 in Fitness, Nature
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Something I’ve meant to do as I cut out more prepared foods is to go for a while without buying any food with any packaging. I think it would make an interesting experiment and I’m learning a lot experientially.

I’ve been thinking about how to do it effectively—most consistently, or most something or other.

Tonight I bought some fruits and vegetables at the produce stand down the block, telling the guy three or four times I didn’t need a bag as he kept trying to give me one, I remembered my principle that “I have low standards the first time.” I’d rather try it imperfectly than never get around to something I plan forever.

So I’ll give a shot at buying no food for a week with any packaging and see what happens. Tonight’s broccoli had a rubber band holding the stalks together so I’ll have to start tomorrow. I’ll allow myself to use things I already have. And I’ll allow buying bulk foods when I bring bags with me, which I do anyway. But anything prepackaged is out. I think that means I’ll have to have almost only fruits, vegetables, legumes, and things close to their natural state. I happen to have a bunch of staples like salt, spices, wine, and oil, so my first time won’t be too hard.

I guess I’ll cut out restaurants too. I’ve been bringing lunches of leftovers with me lately so that shouldn’t be too hard either.

Anyway, I’ll let you know how it goes and if I make it.

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Non-judgmental Ethics Sunday: Can a Colleague ‘Donate’ My Lost Money?

posted by Joshua on April 19, 2015 in Ethicist, Nonjudgment
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Continuing my series of alternative responses to the New York Times column, The Ethicists, looking at the consequences of one’s actions instead of imposing values on others, here is my take on today’s post, ”Can a Colleague ‘Donate’ My Lost Money?” I work in a public hospital, in a poor neighborhood. In between seeing patients,[…] Keep reading →

Peace versus personal freedom

posted by Joshua on April 18, 2015 in Freedom
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I’m not sure how to resolve this, or if anyone can. Some people enjoy fighting, even war. The more freedom you give people, the more freedom they have to promote fighting, which seems to decrease peace. Some say things like “Your freedom ends where mine begins,” suggesting that laws regulate behavior that affects others. Still,[…] Keep reading →